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Mark & Lynda 2013-02-18 01:45 PM

Networking question
 
I will be picking up an 5-port switch to expand my available ports. The switch and router will be located in separate areas of the home. Both router and switch will be gigabit.

My Samsung TV (10/100) will be connected to the router and my computer will be connected to the switch.

If I'm streaming media from the computer to the TV will traffic between the router and the switch slow down to 10/100? ie. will the uplink connection from the router to switch slow to 10/100? or is the port the tv connected to only affected?

R_D_G 2013-02-18 07:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark & Lynda (Post 250514)
I will be picking up an 5-port switch to expand my available ports. The switch and router will be located in separate areas of the home. Both router and switch will be gigabit.

My Samsung TV (10/100) will be connected to the router and my computer will be connected to the switch.

If I'm streaming media from the computer to the TV will traffic between the router and the switch slow down to 10/100? ie. will the uplink connection from the router to switch slow to 10/100? or is the port the tv connected to only affected?

Hi Mark & Lynda.

The switch will not drop the rate between the switch and the router to 100mbs. Ethernet switch ports will clock bits at the physical line rate (10mbps, 100mbps, or 1gbps in your case). The TCP protocol has a windowing mechanism to slow down the traffic if your TV is getting overwhelmed. Or if the file transfer is happening over UDP, the application should have a mechanism for pacing traffic.

Question: why not connect the TV to the ethernet switch? it is more efficient to use the router to route to the internet and keep LAN traffic within the LAN switch.

RDG

GregS 2013-02-18 09:17 PM

Port speeds are negotiated independently to the lowest common denominator.

So anything gigabit to gigabit will remain so.
Anything gigabit to 100mbit will be 100mbit.
Anything 100mbit to 100mbit will be 100mbit.

Mark & Lynda 2013-02-19 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by R_D_G (Post 250543)
Hi Mark & Lynda.

The switch will not drop the rate between the switch and the router to 100mbs. Ethernet switch ports will clock bits at the physical line rate (10mbps, 100mbps, or 1gbps in your case). The TCP protocol has a windowing mechanism to slow down the traffic if your TV is getting overwhelmed. Or if the file transfer is happening over UDP, the application should have a mechanism for pacing traffic.

Question: why not connect the TV to the ethernet switch? it is more efficient to use the router to route to the internet and keep LAN traffic within the LAN switch.

RDG

Thanks guys.

Right now my router is located in the main floor den with three connections in that room (CPU/printer/NAS) and the TV from the family which drops to the basement and back up to the den. And I need to add two more ports.

My original plan was to move the router to the basement, run my family room ethernet drops (3) to the basement and over to the router and one line from router to den for the switch. All basically to avoid running a bunch of cables up to the den. We're remodeling the room and I'm trying to avoid a nest of cables.

I've got a new plan. Going to buy an 8-port switch, move switch and router together to the basement, relocate the NAS to the basement (I don't really need it beside my computer, right), run the printer wireless and feed one line to the den. This will allow me to keep all network hardware together and run everything off the switch as you suggest.

Thanks for making me think about this.

R_D_G 2013-02-20 08:03 AM

No problem Mark & Linda.

Your new plan is good.

Best practice for enterprise LAN design is hierarchical. Adopting that to the home looks something like:

- have an aggregate switch in the basement (or you can use the router for this purpose)
- have an access switch per floor or room
- connect the access switches to the aggregate switch via high speed uplinks.

This way even if you have more than one network device in the room you only need one cable from that room to the basement.

Regards,
RDG


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