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Old 2013-08-27, 11:39 AM
deborachie deborachie is offline
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Default Wet Sanding of drywall

Just wondering if anyone here knows about this method of 'sanding' drywall compound?
We want to finish the basement with an office and bathroom - don't want the 'dust' from sanding drywall (health reasons).
I heard that there is a 'wet' sanding available but nobody I've spoken to knows anything about it???
Has anyone on this forum heard of/used this method? If so, could you post your experiences.
Thanks
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Old 2013-08-27, 06:04 PM
tonyvlx tonyvlx is offline
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Im a drywall finisher. Don't do it. Wait till dry and final sand with 150 grit.
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Old 2013-08-27, 06:52 PM
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good2know good2know is offline
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Hard to describe but I'll try:

There are 2 types of sanding for drywall. The first is removing high spots. The second is removing/softening all of the edges.

A dampened (not soaking wet) soft and smooth cloth can be used to 'sand' the edges where compound meets paper, and where it laps over other compound - corners, and where horizontal and vertical sections meet.

When it gets too dry it will get sticky - so time to rinse, squeeze out and go again. Folding the cloth into a smooth pad is good. You want to avoid rubbing too hard hence removing too much material.

Home Depot sells a sanding kit which attaches to a vacuum. I use a large shop vac with a filter created especially for drywall sanding. Get that and 120 / 150 grit sanding mesh created for use with this tool. You will use that to sand all the surfaces to remove the high spots. There is very little dust that gets airborne with this.

There is more dust when sanding a ceiling seam but not terrible.

After sanding gently wipe down the surfaces to remove dust (or use a floor attachment and vacuum it off).

With a little practice you will get quite good at the amount of water and pressure to use. Worst case you take off too much compound and its easy to add some more where needed.

Hope this helps

g2k

ps don't know if there are contractors who will do this for you, but I've finished many drywall jobs this way for the same reasons
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Old 2013-08-30, 02:39 PM
deborachie deborachie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by good2know View Post
Hard to describe but I'll try:

There are 2 types of sanding for drywall. The first is removing high spots. The second is removing/softening all of the edges.

A dampened (not soaking wet) soft and smooth cloth can be used to 'sand' the edges where compound meets paper, and where it laps over other compound - corners, and where horizontal and vertical sections meet.

When it gets too dry it will get sticky - so time to rinse, squeeze out and go again. Folding the cloth into a smooth pad is good. You want to avoid rubbing too hard hence removing too much material.

Home Depot sells a sanding kit which attaches to a vacuum. I use a large shop vac with a filter created especially for drywall sanding. Get that and 120 / 150 grit sanding mesh created for use with this tool. You will use that to sand all the surfaces to remove the high spots. There is very little dust that gets airborne with this.

There is more dust when sanding a ceiling seam but not terrible.

After sanding gently wipe down the surfaces to remove dust (or use a floor attachment and vacuum it off).

With a little practice you will get quite good at the amount of water and pressure to use. Worst case you take off too much compound and its easy to add some more where needed.

Hope this helps

g2k

ps don't know if there are contractors who will do this for you, but I've finished many drywall jobs this way for the same reasons
Thanks for your feedback good2know! I get a bit nervous - especially this time of year when I'm already fighting with the ragweed pollen.
I'm sure if we take our time, it will be fine ..
Not too long now and we'll be seeing the finished results for our Greenboro home in Stonebridge! Can't wait.
D
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