Go Back   BuildingHomes.ca - Building your community! > Ontario > Ottawa

Ottawa For those in Ottawa, Kanata, Stittsville, Orleans, Nepean. Mattamy, Minto, Bridlewood, Cardel, Claridge, Braebury, Monarch, Barrhaven, Half Moon Bay, Fairwinds, Findlay Creek, Notting Hill, West Pointe, Stonebridge, Edinburgh Common, Uniform at Orchard-Stonebridge-Barrhaven and more!


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 2008-03-17, 11:18 PM
Mark & Lynda Mark & Lynda is offline
Senior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Stouffville
Posts: 2,620
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Inspector Phil Acker View Post
In absense of local code requirements, the manufacturer's spec will have authority. In the case of clearances for ranges, the Ontario Building Code does specify clearance and therefore is the requirement that must be followed. In a nutshell, there can't be any combustible material (e.g. cabinets, valence, trims, etc) that are within 17 3/4" of the area where the range is installed. So if you have any wood within the arc taken upward and adjacent to the area where the range is to be installed, then this would not be acceptable to the code unless the wood was somehow protected by a non-combustible material (now wouldn't that be ugly?)

From the photo, I can't tell whether or not the valence if flushed to the edge of the cabinet would be less than 17 3/4", but I suspect it would be. So the valence cannot be extended into the area bounded by the 17 3/4" arc. By the way, the end panels exposed below the range hood need to be outside that 17 3/4" arc.

I am sure you and I are not alone in saying this is not the way we'd like the valence to look. However the Code is the way it is to protect your health and safety.
Hi Phil. Question for you regarding this because I have never seen a valance installed that way before.

I just measured the clearance from my range top up to the bottom of the cabinet and it measures 19 1/4". From the range to the bottom of my valance is 17". If the returns on the valance were moved 3/4" to the right and to the left, would that pass code? ie. 17" up plus 3/4" to the left and right.

I assume the cabinet clearance in EV's photo is approx the same so moving the valance closer to the range but maintaining that 3/4" space on either side would work..plus look much better.
__________________
Mark
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 2008-03-18, 03:35 PM
GregS's Avatar
GregS GregS is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 4,180
Default

Foundation question was asked/answered. Followups moved to another thread.
__________________
--
We do everything for
Audio - Video - Data - Security
For Your Home - For Your Condo - For Your Office

http://www.phand.ca/
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 2008-03-28, 01:09 PM
mabouseido mabouseido is offline
Junior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 18
Default Home inspection during construction

Hi,

I was told by many that don't bother get a home inspector for new homes during construction. Even if you want to change something, they will not do it as long as it is within the code.

I don't mind paying to an inspector, as long as I am getting the value of my money.

Any feedback on is highly appreciated. Is the cost as one amount or per visit and what should I expect back from the inspector?

Thasks.
Mazin
__________________


Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 2008-03-28, 09:23 PM
Inspector Phil Acker's Avatar
Inspector Phil Acker Inspector Phil Acker is offline
Senior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 1,233
Default

I was told by many that don't bother get a home inspector for new homes during construction.
While under construction, the property is the builder's. Few builders permit outside inspections during the construction of the home. Some contracts are written with conditions that include provisions for inspections at stages during the construction. In general, this applies more to custom built homes.


Even if you want to change something, they will not do it as long as it is within the code.
A home is built to conditions spelled out in your purchase agreement. I'm not sure what you are asking. If you want to make changes when the house is being built, it would only happen if the builder were willing to incorporate a change and if you were willing to pay the cost of the change. If you are asking the builder to do something that exceeds code, then I would expect the builder to either say "No" or "How much money are you willing to spend for this change?"


I don't mind paying to an inspector, as long as I am getting the value of my money.
Let me phrase this a bit differently: you don't mind paying a lot of money for your house as long as you get value for your money. The value of the home inspection is to provide you assurance that the condition of your home meets safety and performance criteria expected by industry and regulatory bodies, and as specified and delivered to you by the builder.


Is the cost as one amount or per visit?
The fee is for each inspection. If you call me back for more than one inspection, the fee is still on a per-inspection basis. Home inspection is not a business that provides products in bulk. Would you expect your lawyer to give you a cut in fees if you have to go back more than once?


What should I expect back from the inspector?
You should expect a thorough inspection conducted to Standards, and that the findings are recorded concisely into a report provided to you by the inspector. The report should identify concerns, as well as the impact the concerns would have on you and the people living in your house if the noted conditions were not rectified.
__________________
Phil Acker, P.Eng, RHI
Acker Home Inspection Inc.

WEB: www.ackerhome.ca
PHONE: 613-447-9660
E-MAIL: phil@ackerhome.ca

Last edited by Inspector Phil Acker; 2008-03-28 at 09:32 PM. Reason: Change to context of question
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 2008-03-28, 11:08 PM
gingern's Avatar
gingern gingern is offline
Senior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: kanata
Posts: 226
Default

do inspectors have a gaurantee of sorts.. in other words, what happens if the inspector i hire misses alot of major things?
__________________
Ginger and Ted
Brentstone, elevation A 3-3
to be completed aug 19 2008
new closing sept 25 2008 *1 extra month to save*
third and hopefully final closing is November 13th



Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 2008-03-29, 08:18 AM
Inspector Phil Acker's Avatar
Inspector Phil Acker Inspector Phil Acker is offline
Senior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 1,233
Default

A home inspection is a visual examination of the primary systems and components of a home. The intent is to identify deficiencies that left uncorrected, could affect the health and safety of the home's occupants, or could result in significant cost to the homeowner. Professional inspectors follow standards that have requirements for items to inspect as well as requirements for reporting. The inspection is not technically exhaustive, which is another way of saying that the inspection is not intended to find all possible defects that currently exist or may become apparent at some point in the future. This is analagous to visiting your doctor for a examination. The doctor will follow a procedure for visual examination that is non-invasive. However, the examination is not an assurance that all possible things wrong have been found, and that you will not have a problem becomes apparent after you walk out of the office. A home inspection looks at the home in context of a snapshot in time, looks at aspects that are accessible, and is non-invasive. On my website, you will find my contract, which you would be required to review and sign before I proceed with an inspection. You will also find the Standards I follow and you can verify my professional qualifications.

For the first part of your question:
No, an inspection does not carry a guarantee.


For the second part of your question:
Provided the inspector follows prescribed Standards of Practice for home inspections, the inspector should not be missing a lot of major deficiencies. If a client feels that the inspector has missed deficiencies due to negligence, then the recourse is to file a complaint with the inspector's professional association. In some cases, legal action may be a recourse if negligence has resulted in significant physical or financial injury to the home owner.
__________________
Phil Acker, P.Eng, RHI
Acker Home Inspection Inc.

WEB: www.ackerhome.ca
PHONE: 613-447-9660
E-MAIL: phil@ackerhome.ca
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 2008-04-02, 11:39 AM
240sxer 240sxer is offline
Junior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 23
Default

Hi Phil,

I have a 4 year old house that I just moved in to. I am noticing little cracks in alot of places around the house, not sure if they're new, but there is def. alot of them. When I say alot, I mean 3 in the kitchen (around the window and entrance) and a couple upstairs.

These are all very small cracks and not longer that a few inches and you cant probably put a pin through it, but it sort of has me worried.

Should i be? What kind of cracks should I be worried about?

Last edited by 240sxer; 2008-04-02 at 11:47 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 2008-04-02, 09:25 PM
Inspector Phil Acker's Avatar
Inspector Phil Acker Inspector Phil Acker is offline
Senior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 1,233
Default

Cracks can be due to a number of factors, so without seeing them, its hard to be able to say whether or not you should be concerned. If you look closely enough, probably every home has a drywall crack somewhere. Many are due to shrinkage when wood-frame homes age. Sometimes cracks can be due to relieving a built-up stress, but are of no structural consequence. The cracks that are of greatest concern are those that are due to structural settlement, or due to a structural deficiency.

Now that you are aware of these cracks, keep an eye on them for any change over time. Also look for other clues for structural concerns, such as doors and windows that have become difficult to open, cracks in the foundation and masonry, and humps in the floor that you hadn't noticed before.
__________________
Phil Acker, P.Eng, RHI
Acker Home Inspection Inc.

WEB: www.ackerhome.ca
PHONE: 613-447-9660
E-MAIL: phil@ackerhome.ca
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 2008-04-05, 12:49 AM
csmfung csmfung is offline
Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 35
Default

Great thread Phil!

I was planning on hiring an inspector for my PDI and have the following questions:

1. How long does the PDI usually last? (Our house is approx 1800 sq ft)

2. What range of fees do inspectors usually charge (so we know we're not being overcharged)?

3. Do inspectors check inside the attic/crawl space and climb on top of the roof? The reason I ask is because we've upgraded our insulation right below the attic and paid for a wiring conduit from attic-to-basement. We would want some assurance that these upgrades were completed. Also, during construction, we saw a BIG hole in our roof and want to ensure that it's properly patched up before they installed the shingles. The last thing we want is to have squirells and raccoons living in our attic like our current neighbor!

4. If the builders' representative does not agree with an issue/deficiency, what means do we have to make sure that it gets documented?

5. On a similar matter, if there are cosmetic issues, such as scratched hardwood or countertops, poor workmanship etc., is the builders' rep obligated to document these things to get them fixed?

Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 2008-04-05, 10:48 PM
Inspector Phil Acker's Avatar
Inspector Phil Acker Inspector Phil Acker is offline
Senior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 1,233
Default

1. How long does the PDI usually last? (Our house is approx 1800 sq ft)
For the builder, generally about an hour per 1000 sq ft; I have my inspection completed to respect the builder's time budget
2. What range of fees do inspectors usually charge (so we know we're not being overcharged)?
I don't know. I don't ask other inspectors what they charge.
3. Do inspectors check inside the attic/crawl space and climb on top of the roof?
"Yes" to the first part, assuming they are conducting the inspection to comply with Standards of Practice for home inspections; "They shouldn't" to the second part of your question, as this exceeds the requirements of standards. As for your reasons for raising this: I would usually be able to address all your concerns as part of my normal process.
4. If the builders' representative does not agree with an issue/deficiency, what means do we have to make sure that it gets documented?
The PDI form is the builder's document and they will enter issues by their sole discretion. The builder's rep does not have to accept any of the input from the independant inspector. The recourse to the homeowner is to either withhold signing the PDI form if you disagree with it (but be forewarned that this will lead to possibly expensive legal hassles) or enter the concerns into the 30-day form.
5. On a similar matter, if there are cosmetic issues, such as scratched hardwood or countertops, poor workmanship etc., is the builders' rep obligated to document these things to get them fixed?
Yes, the builder's rep should enter these; a short-cut is to put markers on minor items as listing all small cosmetic items would be an arduous task.
With regard to questions 4 and 5 above: I have done a lot of PDI inspections. I think most builder's reps are conscientious in the way they conduct the PDI process and enter information in the spirit of good faith. I personally am at a loss to be able to recall situations where I've encountered significant problems with builder's reps during any of my inspections.
__________________
Phil Acker, P.Eng, RHI
Acker Home Inspection Inc.

WEB: www.ackerhome.ca
PHONE: 613-447-9660
E-MAIL: phil@ackerhome.ca

Last edited by Inspector Phil Acker; 2009-06-14 at 06:53 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
home inspection

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Home inspector Misha_Nikki Ottawa 12 2008-03-08 07:15 PM
Home Inspector miko1234 Home Owner Tips, Upgrades and Maintenance 3 2007-10-03 09:37 PM
Home Inspector Mark & Lynda Stouffville - River Ridge, MainStreet and Country Lane 0 2007-09-12 11:31 PM
Home Inspector heatherandcameron Stouffville - Mattamy On Main and Wheler’S Mill 7 2007-02-11 05:12 PM
Home Inspector jms Milton 3 2006-09-13 07:36 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:43 PM.



Copyright © PHAND Corporation
This document may not be used elsewhere without the expressed written consent of PHAND Corporation.
*** There is no association between this website and any builder. ***

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.