Go Back   BuildingHomes.ca - Building your community! > Ontario > Ottawa

Ottawa For those in Ottawa, Kanata, Stittsville, Orleans, Nepean. Mattamy, Minto, Bridlewood, Cardel, Claridge, Braebury, Monarch, Barrhaven, Half Moon Bay, Fairwinds, Findlay Creek, Notting Hill, West Pointe, Stonebridge, Edinburgh Common, Uniform at Orchard-Stonebridge-Barrhaven and more!


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #2691  
Old 2020-09-21, 09:06 PM
Inspector Phil Acker's Avatar
Inspector Phil Acker Inspector Phil Acker is offline
Senior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 1,272
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jebus05 View Post
I have attached an album of 15 images however only 8 unique issues.
If you could ever be so kind to look at them and tell me if I should be putting this on the 30 Day warranty it would be much appreciated.

Thanks,
Jebus.
Hi Jebus. I feel that any issues of concern that you are observing should be entered into the Tarion warranty claim.

One issue that you seem most concerned with is how the vinyl siding ends are handled at the windows. The window is a style that has its own channel for holding the ends of the vinyl siding. No separate siding component, such as j-channel, is required. The issue is more one of cosmetic appearance. The taping is too visible. The vinyl siding should have been tucked in a bit more; best practice is to have about 1/4 inch gap between the edge at the end of the vinyl siding strip and the back surface of the window frame channel.

Its not unusual to see missing fill along the foundation walls. It would be desirable to add fill and achieve rough grading before winter hits.
__________________
Phil Acker, P.Eng, RHI
Acker Home Inspection Inc.

WEB: www.ackerhome.ca
PHONE: 613-447-9660
E-MAIL: phil@ackerhome.ca
Reply With Quote
  #2692  
Old 2020-10-02, 01:24 PM
paquettc paquettc is online now
Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: ON/Barrhaven
Posts: 72
Default

Hi,

We had an issue the other day where smoke was detected in my son's bedroom (there was no smoke and eventually it went off on it's own). We're still not sure why it went off but after it did, that unit, along with 2 other bedroom units were in a fault state (no green light showing). In the process of checking the manual for resetting the units I found that all but the detector in the upstairs hallway were regular smoke detectors. The upstairs hallway detects CO as well.

I checked the Ontario building code and it states that a CO detector must be installed adjacent to sleeping spaces in residences that have fuel-burning appliances. My question is this: If all my detectors are linked throughout my home, why is it code to install a CO detector at the furthest point in the house from the potentially harmful appliance? My concern is that if we were hanging out in the basement and our furnace went bad, the CO would have to build up from the basement to the second story before the alarm would go off potentially putting us at risk. If the detectors are all linked, it seems logical that you'd have a detector on each floor where there's a fuel-burning appliance to ensure an alarm is triggered as soon as possible.

Thoughts?

Thanks,

Chad
Reply With Quote
  #2693  
Old 2020-10-02, 05:54 PM
Inspector Phil Acker's Avatar
Inspector Phil Acker Inspector Phil Acker is offline
Senior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 1,272
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by paquettc View Post
Hi,

We had an issue the other day where smoke was detected in my son's bedroom (there was no smoke and eventually it went off on it's own). We're still not sure why it went off but after it did, that unit, along with 2 other bedroom units were in a fault state (no green light showing). In the process of checking the manual for resetting the units I found that all but the detector in the upstairs hallway were regular smoke detectors. The upstairs hallway detects CO as well.

I checked the Ontario building code and it states that a CO detector must be installed adjacent to sleeping spaces in residences that have fuel-burning appliances. My question is this: If all my detectors are linked throughout my home, why is it code to install a CO detector at the furthest point in the house from the potentially harmful appliance? My concern is that if we were hanging out in the basement and our furnace went bad, the CO would have to build up from the basement to the second story before the alarm would go off potentially putting us at risk. If the detectors are all linked, it seems logical that you'd have a detector on each floor where there's a fuel-burning appliance to ensure an alarm is triggered as soon as possible.
The requirement for a carbon monoxide detector is that one is required for each level in a home that has bedrooms on it. The concentration of carbon monoxide that sets off the alarm is significantly lower than the level that would cause you harm. Refer to this link for a more detailed explanation:
https://www.kidde.com/home-safety/en...nd%20100%20PPM

The intent of having the alarm close to the bedrooms is to ensure it wakes you up before the concentration reaches a level that is harmful.
__________________
Phil Acker, P.Eng, RHI
Acker Home Inspection Inc.

WEB: www.ackerhome.ca
PHONE: 613-447-9660
E-MAIL: phil@ackerhome.ca
Reply With Quote
  #2694  
Old 2020-10-02, 08:09 PM
paquettc paquettc is online now
Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: ON/Barrhaven
Posts: 72
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Inspector Phil Acker View Post
The requirement for a carbon monoxide detector is that one is required for each level in a home that has bedrooms on it. The concentration of carbon monoxide that sets off the alarm is significantly lower than the level that would cause you harm. Refer to this link for a more detailed explanation:
https://www.kidde.com/home-safety/en...nd%20100%20PPM

The intent of having the alarm close to the bedrooms is to ensure it wakes you up before the concentration reaches a level that is harmful.
Hi Phil,

Thanks for the reply. I totally get that an alarm has to be by the bedrooms so you can hear it in the night. My only gripe is that I'd want to be alerted ASAP in the event my fireplace or furnace malfunction. As all the detectors are linked together it would make sense to have a CO detector near the appliance so it's detected ASAP.

I actually posed the question to the Building code group for the province. To my surprise I received a phone call a couple of hours later. He went over the code just as you did which was my original understanding. He did mention that there was a proposal in 2017 to have CO detectors on each floor where there was an appliance but that it was thrown out. There was no interest nationally and the province was trying to harmonize with the Canadian Building Code.

I'd rather be safe than sorry so I've ordered another Kidde 3-1, the same as my upstairs hallway. I'll swap it out with the standard smoke detector in the basement so it's as close to the furnace as possible.

Chad
Reply With Quote
  #2695  
Old 2020-10-04, 08:07 AM
MrFord MrFord is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: ON/Ottawa
Posts: 5
Default

Hi Phil,

My house is being built now by one of the Ottawa big builders. They poured foundation in July. Framed it in August and things were going well overall. I was hoping for them to put shingles on a roof before Sept but it did not happen. Now it is October and I am still waiting for them to put shingles and seal the roof.

In the mean time, other work has been done inside. They poured basement concrete floor and started to frame basement walls. They have also installed wall insulation in some areas of the house like behind a fireplace and sealed it.

The problem is, last week we had a lot of rain and my house inside is all wet. Basement is flooded. I checked the insulation behind the fireplace and it is getting wet.

Should I be concerned? How big of a problem is it?

Thanks,
Ford

Last edited by MrFord; 2020-10-04 at 08:32 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #2696  
Old 2020-10-05, 08:10 AM
Inspector Phil Acker's Avatar
Inspector Phil Acker Inspector Phil Acker is offline
Senior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 1,272
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrFord View Post
My house is being built now by one of the Ottawa big builders. They poured foundation in July. Framed it in August and things were going well overall. I was hoping for them to put shingles on a roof before Sept but it did not happen. Now it is October and I am still waiting for them to put shingles and seal the roof.

In the mean time, other work has been done inside. They poured basement concrete floor and started to frame basement walls. They have also installed wall insulation in some areas of the house like behind a fireplace and sealed it.

The problem is, last week we had a lot of rain and my house inside is all wet. Basement is flooded. I checked the insulation behind the fireplace and it is getting wet.

Should I be concerned? How big of a problem is it?
Best practice is to install shingles to the upper roof as soon as possible after the roof sheathing is installed, and to install windows & outside doors then apply building wrap as soon as possible to keep out water. Shingling of the garage and porch roof is often put off until after exterior cladding is completed to prevent damage to shingles.

I would be concerned with water getting into insulated walls where the vapour barrier is installed as this would be conducive to mold. If batt insulation becomes saturated with water, this would also be a problem as the insulation would slump and compress.

Although OSB and engineered trusses & floor joists are water resistant, trapped water in contact areas can result in mold. Any visible mold would require remediation, such as applying an appropriate anti-microbial paint. Industrial dehumidifiers and fans should be used to dry out areas where flooding has occurred.
__________________
Phil Acker, P.Eng, RHI
Acker Home Inspection Inc.

WEB: www.ackerhome.ca
PHONE: 613-447-9660
E-MAIL: phil@ackerhome.ca
Reply With Quote
  #2697  
Old 2020-10-19, 11:48 AM
TE2019 TE2019 is offline
Junior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: ottawa
Posts: 18
Default

Hi Phil,

We recently had our 1 year warranty inspection and I flagged an issue with flaking concrete on the outer portion of the garage slab. However, i was told this was normal and due to salt usage.. This doesn't seem right as I've never had this issue with previous homes. What are your thoughts on this and how would it even be repaired?

Thanks
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Garage Slab.jpg
Views:	41
Size:	1.54 MB
ID:	14776  
Reply With Quote
  #2698  
Old 2020-10-19, 04:55 PM
xdarrylx's Avatar
xdarrylx xdarrylx is offline
Senior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Barrhaven, Ontario
Posts: 2,001
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TE2019 View Post
Hi Phil,

We recently had our 1 year warranty inspection and I flagged an issue with flaking concrete on the outer portion of the garage slab. However, i was told this was normal and due to salt usage.. This doesn't seem right as I've never had this issue with previous homes. What are your thoughts on this and how would it even be repaired?

Thanks
Same issue. It sucks.

The builder tried to repair it after 1yr and the "repair" flaked off after 2yrs and I've just learned to look past it as it wasn't worth my time/energy for multiple repairs.
Reply With Quote
  #2699  
Old 2020-10-19, 07:52 PM
BrianT's Avatar
BrianT BrianT is offline
Senior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Ontario - Orleans
Posts: 3,175
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TE2019 View Post
Hi Phil,

We recently had our 1 year warranty inspection and I flagged an issue with flaking concrete on the outer portion of the garage slab. However, i was told this was normal and due to salt usage.. This doesn't seem right as I've never had this issue with previous homes. What are your thoughts on this and how would it even be repaired?

Thanks

Have you been using those garage flooring for a long time? My neighbour was using them for a few years and one spring he went to clean them and discovered his entire garage floor looked your outer edge. He had a someone come in and take a look. He was told that the salt accumulated underneath and the weight of the car grinded the concrete away. He ended up getting his whole garage epoxied as he was told that patches will flake off and look bad.
__________________
Builder: Tamarack Homes
Location: Chaperal (Orleans)
House: Avon 4E
Moved In: April 10th 2010
Reply With Quote
  #2700  
Old 2020-10-20, 09:11 AM
TE2019 TE2019 is offline
Junior Member
Regular User
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: ottawa
Posts: 18
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by xdarrylx View Post
Same issue. It sucks.

The builder tried to repair it after 1yr and the "repair" flaked off after 2yrs and I've just learned to look past it as it wasn't worth my time/energy for multiple repairs.
That's really disappointing!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
home inspection

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Home inspector Misha_Nikki Ottawa 12 2008-03-08 07:15 PM
Home Inspector miko1234 Home Owner Tips, Upgrades and Maintenance 3 2007-10-03 09:37 PM
Home Inspector Mark & Lynda Stouffville - River Ridge, MainStreet and Country Lane 0 2007-09-12 11:31 PM
Home Inspector heatherandcameron Stouffville - Mattamy On Main and Wheler’S Mill 7 2007-02-11 05:12 PM
Home Inspector jms Milton 3 2006-09-13 07:36 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:26 AM.



Copyright © PHAND Corporation
This document may not be used elsewhere without the expressed written consent of PHAND Corporation.
*** There is no association between this website and any builder. ***

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.