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  #11  
Old 2014-07-19, 12:28 PM
kreutz73 kreutz73 is offline
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Never heard that putting a tv type power cable in a tube chase isn't allowed. a lot of integrated TV stands do this same with higher wattage computer power cords... they are bundled and/or put in chases or channels all the time. Not that I don't believe you guys... do you have any references to a code or something that explains it?
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  #12  
Old 2014-07-19, 06:55 PM
London2Ottawa London2Ottawa is offline
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Those stands are not in the wall. And there's no need for power to go through a wall, a power bar can be neatly arranged behind a wall mounted TV
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  #13  
Old 2014-07-20, 08:55 AM
kreutz73 kreutz73 is offline
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That's actually the reason I've used chases in the past. Often cases the TV mounts are very low profile and the TV sits very close to the wall. So close that a flush mounted receptacle will not work let alone a surge protector power bar. By properly routing power and AV cables you do not put any stress on the strain relief ends (connections of the cables themselves) and you reduce the chance you will damage the connections at the TV.

I'm curious if this is opinion or if you guys are actually aware of a code that references this.

I would think putting an outlet intentionally directly behind a TV that is to be wall mounted is the least desirable as there's no way to ensure protection of the romex supplying the outlet.. TV mounts require multiple large and long fasteners that could very easily nick or break the romex in the wall.
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  #14  
Old 2014-07-20, 09:48 AM
Trepex Trepex is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kreutz73 View Post
That's actually the reason I've used chases in the past. Often cases the TV mounts are very low profile and the TV sits very close to the wall. So close that a flush mounted receptacle will not work let alone a surge protector power bar. By properly routing power and AV cables you do not put any stress on the strain relief ends (connections of the cables themselves) and you reduce the chance you will damage the connections at the TV.

I'm curious if this is opinion or if you guys are actually aware of a code that references this.

I would think putting an outlet intentionally directly behind a TV that is to be wall mounted is the least desirable as there's no way to ensure protection of the romex supplying the outlet.. TV mounts require multiple large and long fasteners that could very easily nick or break the romex in the wall.
You have to use "in wall certified wire". Running a consumer power cable through a closed wall is absolutely against code and ESA. Proper romex is rated up to - for example - 90degrees. A consumer wire in the wall can heat and melt before a breaker trips, and it's a fire hazard.

Here are a couple of hits (I searched for "ontario code power cable in wall"):
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r289...-Code-question
http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/showthread.php?p=866993
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  #15  
Old 2014-07-20, 09:49 AM
Trepex Trepex is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kreutz73 View Post
I would think putting an outlet intentionally directly behind a TV that is to be wall mounted is the least desirable as there's no way to ensure protection of the romex supplying the outlet.. TV mounts require multiple large and long fasteners that could very easily nick or break the romex in the wall.
Which is why you screw/bolt the brackets into studs, and why your wiring should be properly run, stapled, etc. The only way you would go through the wiring is if you tried to put a lag bolt through and completely missed a stud, I guess?
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  #16  
Old 2014-07-20, 04:49 PM
kreutz73 kreutz73 is offline
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The only way you would go through the wiring is if you tried to put a lag bolt through and completely missed a stud, I guess?
This is why I pointed it out... it is definitely possible. romex is stapled to the studs, only about 1.5" behind the drywall. The lag bolts for wall brackets are big and can easily miss or poke out the side of a stud and are long enough to reach the romex.
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  #17  
Old 2014-07-20, 05:04 PM
kreutz73 kreutz73 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trepex View Post
You have to use "in wall certified wire". Running a consumer power cable through a closed wall is absolutely against code and ESA. Proper romex is rated up to - for example - 90degrees. A consumer wire in the wall can heat and melt before a breaker trips, and it's a fire hazard.
yeah, some old debates on the net. TV power cords are actually rated though, at least all of mine are. Not like flex cords or typical consumer extension cords... understand the requirements and limitations for unrated cords there and agree on that. My TV power cords are essentially black romex. rated CSA/UL, 300V, 60 deg which is plenty for a 45W LED tv with no amp draw compared to other fixtures/appliances.

So... proper insulated wire, in a fire rated & oversized tube chase is no good? that's where I'm having trouble understanding the code violation here.
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  #18  
Old 2014-07-21, 08:55 AM
elo elo is offline
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I bought one of this TV bracket in Walmart, it works well.

http://www.walmart.ca/en/ip/11832341.../6000187094812
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  #19  
Old 2014-07-21, 11:42 AM
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gerapau gerapau is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kreutz73 View Post
yeah, some old debates on the net. TV power cords are actually rated though, at least all of mine are. Not like flex cords or typical consumer extension cords... understand the requirements and limitations for unrated cords there and agree on that. My TV power cords are essentially black romex. rated CSA/UL, 300V, 60 deg which is plenty for a 45W LED tv with no amp draw compared to other fixtures/appliances.

So... proper insulated wire, in a fire rated & oversized tube chase is no good? that's where I'm having trouble understanding the code violation here.
And your TV power cord is long enough to go all the way through the conduit and plug into the nearest outlet at the other end? That is a long TV power cord.
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  #20  
Old 2014-07-21, 12:43 PM
Trepex Trepex is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kreutz73 View Post
yeah, some old debates on the net. TV power cords are actually rated though, at least all of mine are. Not like flex cords or typical consumer extension cords... understand the requirements and limitations for unrated cords there and agree on that. My TV power cords are essentially black romex. rated CSA/UL, 300V, 60 deg which is plenty for a 45W LED tv with no amp draw compared to other fixtures/appliances.

So... proper insulated wire, in a fire rated & oversized tube chase is no good? that's where I'm having trouble understanding the code violation here.
"Some old debates on the net"? Google a bit more, and see if you can find anything indicating that building codes or electrical standards in one state/province or another allow it.

Unfortunately electrical code is not premised on the fact that some cords might not pose as much of a risk as others. Codes are written in a way as to best mitigate risk, even if in some cases there might be a way to do something, with certain materials, safely. The fact is that if you ask an electrician or call up the ESA, you'll be told that you cannot run a power cord through a wall - conduit or not.
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