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  #51  
Old 2011-03-22, 05:29 PM
homie27 homie27 is offline
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so what do you do in the case as shown in the pictures? can you buy some sort of anti-EMI sleeve to wrap the network cables that are exposed in the basement?

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Originally Posted by GregS View Post
Exactly. Who knows? We have to run cabling near electrical wire all the time. And this is usually when having to span between floors. See a picture of one we did just last week.


If I were to install network cables in a house already built? Then it's entirely retofit and the cables will go where they can go.
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  #52  
Old 2011-03-22, 09:40 PM
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Yes, but why would you?


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so what do you do in the case as shown in the pictures? can you buy some sort of anti-EMI sleeve to wrap the network cables that are exposed in the basement?
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  #53  
Old 2011-03-23, 12:17 PM
homie27 homie27 is offline
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this wouldn't help?

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Yes, but why would you?
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  #54  
Old 2011-03-23, 12:19 PM
homie27 homie27 is offline
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Ok last night I ran a couple of tests on my network. I used something called Performance Test by Passmark Software. The first test was with my PC and laptop plugged into the router using cat5e and got 353Mbps. This morning I had the laptop plugged into the PC using a cat5e crossover cable and got 357Mbps. That's very disappointing. but it seems to me that the PC and/or laptop is slowing everything down. you think?
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  #55  
Old 2011-03-23, 01:51 PM
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Yes. Networks cards in PCs are usually the cheapest solution available.

'in the old days' we used to spec hardware interupt based cards so they don't rely upon the CPU so much to drive traffic. You can still do that, however you are buying a card to go into your PC for at least $100.
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  #56  
Old 2011-03-23, 02:26 PM
R_D_G R_D_G is offline
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Homie.

Here's my two cents.

If your goal is merely to benchmark the throughput through your ethernet cables to ensure that you are not getting ripped off, you have to change the way you are testing it. I am thinking of a couple of ways to test this:

1) You mentioned that you are in IT. Get some of the networking folks at your work to lend you a proper test set (IXIA, agilent, etc.) and use this to generate the traffic. While at it, borrow two gigabit ethernet switches...or
2) buy or borrow two gigabit ethernet switches and use the cable you are testing to connect the two switches. Get hold of a few laptops / PCs (I think 6 should be enough) and connect 3 to each switch. Setup the same test you ran before between pairs of laptops / PCs. Then add the throughput from all the tests.


If your goal is to improve throughput between two machines, there are a lot of things you need to consider:
1) As Greg suggested, get a good NIC (one that supports interrupt coalescing and preferrably one that uses PCI-X or 64 bit technology)
2) Understand the architecture of the application you are using to transfer data between your machines. e.g. is it TCP or UDP based? Can you adjust the windowing parameters?
3) Understand the hardware of your machines and look for bottlenecks (e.g. harddrive speed), front side bus capacity, etc.

One thing you can try is adjusting the MTU of both machines to equal the MTU of your network. This is usually 1500 bytes (including IP overhead) but it depends on your networking equipment. Note that adjusting the MTU to 1500 in your home network might have some adverse effects to your WAN. DSL and cable usually have MTU sizes much smaller than 1500 which can cause fragmentation...so it's a tradeoff between how efficient you can make your communication over your LAN vs how efficient you can make your WAN.

Regards,
RDG
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  #57  
Old 2011-03-23, 02:46 PM
homie27 homie27 is offline
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I'm using a benchmarking software called Performance Test by Passmark Software. is that not a good one? I also have sisoftware Sandra lite1743, but I haven't tried it yet. I don't have alot of time when I get home.

My PC is using an MTU of 9000. the laptop doesn't have an MTU setting though. could it be called something else?

I can't get all that hardware, plus its to much work. I'll do what testing I can, after that, what ever I have, is that I have and I'll have to live with it.

thanks

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Originally Posted by R_D_G View Post
Homie.

Here's my two cents.

If your goal is merely to benchmark the throughput through your ethernet cables to ensure that you are not getting ripped off, you have to change the way you are testing it. I am thinking of a couple of ways to test this:

1) You mentioned that you are in IT. Get some of the networking folks at your work to lend you a proper test set (IXIA, agilent, etc.) and use this to generate the traffic. While at it, borrow two gigabit ethernet switches...or
2) buy or borrow two gigabit ethernet switches and use the cable you are testing to connect the two switches. Get hold of a few laptops / PCs (I think 6 should be enough) and connect 3 to each switch. Setup the same test you ran before between pairs of laptops / PCs. Then add the throughput from all the tests.


If your goal is to improve throughput between two machines, there are a lot of things you need to consider:
1) As Greg suggested, get a good NIC (one that supports interrupt coalescing and preferrably one that uses PCI-X or 64 bit technology)
2) Understand the architecture of the application you are using to transfer data between your machines. e.g. is it TCP or UDP based? Can you adjust the windowing parameters?
3) Understand the hardware of your machines and look for bottlenecks (e.g. harddrive speed), front side bus capacity, etc.

One thing you can try is adjusting the MTU of both machines to equal the MTU of your network. This is usually 1500 bytes (including IP overhead) but it depends on your networking equipment. Note that adjusting the MTU to 1500 in your home network might have some adverse effects to your WAN. DSL and cable usually have MTU sizes much smaller than 1500 which can cause fragmentation...so it's a tradeoff between how efficient you can make your communication over your LAN vs how efficient you can make your WAN.

Regards,
RDG

Last edited by homie27; 2011-03-23 at 02:49 PM.
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  #58  
Old 2011-03-23, 02:50 PM
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Actually that's a good point. If you can adjust your packet size to something larger for TCP traffic, then you'll have less ACKs to wait for.

And a larger buffer in the gig switches can help too. I spec things for media streaming and make sure that there is at least a 512K buffer available in the switch, which is very handy for UDP based traffic.

I have a JDSU ValidatorNT that I use for doing speed tests. It pushes a fixed amount of data through data at 985Mb/sec to certify speeds. Takes a while to do, but then at least you can be sure.
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  #59  
Old 2011-03-23, 03:08 PM
homie27 homie27 is offline
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Canada Computers and Tiger Direct don't have this. Is this something I can buy and if so, how much is it?
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  #60  
Old 2011-03-23, 04:07 PM
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This is not something that would be sold through places like that. It's about $1500 USD.
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