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  #121  
Old 2008-08-25, 10:33 AM
bmcnally bmcnally is offline
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Originally Posted by john and Mo View Post
WRT the quiet wall, Mattamy uses the grey BATT sound proofing. Make sure they stuff it in there too, as ours was missed and so were some of our neighbours'. It can be retrofitted, but that's a hassle, a mess, and a waste of time.
Thanks John
I'll be contacting them today via email to customer care to take the wall out to put it in. Builder has been so busy his voicemail has been full for the past 3 days...well its always full but I've been trying to reach him for 3 days.

arrrrggggg...
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  #122  
Old 2008-08-25, 02:55 PM
Robert Robert is offline
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Default New Foundation Issue

Phil,

We just checked out our newly poured foundation from Monarch in Stittsville and have noticed that the top inside edge to be missing chunks of various sizes. Now I'm not a nit picker, but one of the missing pieces is in the cut out for the I-Beam support and is about the size of my fist or a softball. Both of my neighbours seem to be fine. Should this be cause of concern?

Thanks for the help.
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  #123  
Old 2008-08-25, 09:03 PM
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Inspector Phil Acker Inspector Phil Acker is offline
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Originally Posted by wannabeon View Post
I noticed a little gap in the plywood covering under the roof overhang. There's also some gap between the roof and the wall over the said gap as well. I've attached some pictures. I didn't see this occurring in other units. Mine has a metal bar that protrudes outward which I didn't notice in other units either. Should I be concerned?
As I see it, its premature to be concerned. The gaps in the wallboard [exterior sheathing; its called "OSB", or oriented strand board] look like they will be under flashings and trims, so my opinion is that the end result should be OK.
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Last edited by Inspector Phil Acker; 2008-08-26 at 08:31 AM.
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  #124  
Old 2008-08-25, 09:13 PM
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Inspector Phil Acker Inspector Phil Acker is offline
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Originally Posted by Robert View Post
We just checked out our newly poured foundation from Monarch in Stittsville and have noticed that the top inside edge to be missing chunks of various sizes. Now I'm not a nit picker, but one of the missing pieces is in the cut out for the I-Beam support and is about the size of my fist or a softball. Both of my neighbours seem to be fine. Should this be cause of concern?
From a structural point of view, this shouldn't be of too much concern. The chip-out will probably get filled in later. Two opportunities for this will be: a) when they set the sill board [many builders set the sill board onto a mortar bed when they level and anchor the sill plate; they'd "butter" in the chipped area then]; or b) when the beam is set and leveled [they fill the gaps at the beam pocket with mortar].
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  #125  
Old 2008-08-26, 11:35 AM
wannabeon wannabeon is offline
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Originally Posted by Inspector Phil Acker View Post
As I see it, its premature to be concerned. The gaps in the wallboard [exterior sheathing; its called "OSB", or oriented strand board] look like they will be under flashings and trims, so my opinion is that the end result should be OK.
Thank you Phil for your response.
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  #126  
Old 2008-09-04, 11:09 PM
Mike&Mandy Mike&Mandy is offline
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Hi Phil;

I went out and took some pictures of the exterior of my house today. Upon reviewing them, I have some questions for you.

1) Is a sill gasket required where wood touches concrete? In my garage, I have the sill plate directly on concrete - looks like it's mortared in.
2) There appears to be mildew on some of the exterior drwall. Is this a cause for concern?
3) There are large areas (over 6 sq. in.) in the exterior drywall that are either chipped or that have the backer missing. Should I be worried?

It is getting to the point now where I would expect to see building wrap very soon, so I want to get on this, if necessary. Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated. I have attached some pictures. The mildew is between the first and second floor, on the right, the missing paper is near the top of the second floor.

Thank you in advance for this, and thank you for the service you provide us all!
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  #127  
Old 2008-09-05, 08:39 AM
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  1. The Building Code requires that the sill board be either set in a mortar bed, or if set directly onto the foundation, that it be effectively sealed. For the latter, common methods in practice include using a sill gasket or caulking. You're stating that the sill board is set in mortar, which is an accepted method. Gaps in the mortar bed should be filled/sealed.
  1. In my opinion, damaged materials should not be incorporated into a building. The function of the drywall in this case is to provide a fire separation between the attached units. If the material characteristics have been affected by mechanical and water damage, the affected materials should be replaced. In this Forum, I need to be careful in making statements whether a specific issue is acceptable or unacceptable, so my advice is to discuss your concern with the Builder, and if not satisfied, discuss with the City of Ottawa building inspectors.
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  #128  
Old 2008-09-05, 08:01 PM
Mike&Mandy Mike&Mandy is offline
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Thanks for your advice Phil, I appreciate it!
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  #129  
Old 2008-09-10, 09:55 PM
wannabeon wannabeon is offline
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Default Possible deficiencies

Hi Phil,

again, I have more questions regarding my home.

Please refer to pictures.

1. There was a puncture in the drywall at the rear exterior of the building. It wasn't fixed up but was covered up with plastic sheet that covered the whole exterior without fixing the hole. Should I be concerned about the slow repair? Is it repairable or should the drywall panel be replaced? Is it normal to use drywall instead of plywood panel for exterior wall?

2. It seems the metal stick holding the duct in place got moved and left a hole where the screw was before. Is that a concern? Would I lose heat and/or AC air?

3. As you can see, the duct has a slight bend where two pipes connect. May 2-3 degrees? Is that acceptable? It seems they were trying to make room for the light switch. Should light switch be allowed to be that close?

4. The filler between the window gap has holes. Very small to be really noticed but are visible. is that going to cause heat/cold air loss during the seasons? Or is it negligeable?

5. There was a slight gap between the exterior plywood and the interior skeleton 2x6. The exterior eventually will be brick. Should I remind the builder to give it a few more nails to close it up? is it going to cause loss of heat?

6. More gap... between the staircase and the floor adjacent. is that going to result in a weak connection and collapse in stairs?

7. finally, i'm not sure what that is. I can't tell whether a supporting frame was cut at the top and connected with smaller pieces or just shaved at the sides. What do you think it is?

Thanks Phil.
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  #130  
Old 2008-09-11, 11:32 AM
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Inspector Phil Acker Inspector Phil Acker is offline
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In this forum, I am hesitant to reply to specific issues for work that is progress. In the overall process of building a home, certain things get done as temporary conditions but get corrected at a later stage. For example, in the first photo, there is a notation on the drywall to indicate a repair is required; the assumption is that this will be repaired before the insulation is installed. Yes, its possible that intended fixes and repairs get neglected, but in fairness to the builder, I have to give them the benefit of the doubt that they will apply good practices throughout the construction stages.

I appreciate your concerns, but I have to decline on replying to issues that cannot be responded to in a general sense. Looking back at previous posts, I see that I have been drifting into an "armchair inspector" role and this is not appropriate.

Have you discussed these concerns with your builder?

Now here's some general answers to general conditions:
- drywall for exterior applications will frequently be selected for common walls between row units, as it serves to meet the requirements for a fire separation between units.
- ducts for heating and cooling should be sized and run with minimal turns and bends to promote good air flow. Ducting does not need to be plumb and square. As long as there is good airflow to the registers, there is latitude in running the ducts to achieve the intended result. It is good practice to seal holes in ducts to reduce unintended air loss.
- there is latitude in placing exterior sheathing, so some gaps will occur that do not affect the overall integrity of the assembled unit. Often gaps get covered over by flashings or finishes that meet the intensions for adequacy of the assembly.
- Provided an electrical junction box is properly grounded, close proximity of junction boxes with ducting should not be a concern. However, insulated copper wiring should not be in direct contact with ducts.
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Last edited by Inspector Phil Acker; 2008-09-11 at 01:41 PM.
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